Think different, Treat expectations, Treat negative emotions

A letter for new moms – How to survive with your toddler

Following feedbacks for my previous “Letter for new moms – How to survive the first year of being a mother”, I think it is necessary to again share my experience of dealing with a toddler, the one that drains most of our energy! 

So, dear mom, 

Fever, fever, fever all the times! 

As a parent of a toddler, you may recall the sleepless nights, over-worried feelings and the fuzzle of what to do next during your precious’ fever. In deed, it can be a disturbing thing for parents to manage. Regularly a high fever in little children can spring out of the blue and reach alarming heights, but a fever itself can never be as a disaster as your over-anxiety.

Let me describe a bit about my situation so that you can easily imagine the things I am talking about. I am a type of over-anxiety mom. I just have one child and since he was born, I kind of turned into an over-exaggerated mom, regarding anger and anxiety. My baby, on his third day in this world, got  pneumonia, and was taken away from me and sent to the PICU for one week (to me it was like forever). After that, he got heavy breaths for like 3 months. When he was sleeping, I had to wake up from time to time to check on him and make sure he was fine dealing with his hissing sounds. It took him quite a long time to get over it, not until his 4th month when his breath became normal and me getting so used to checking him.

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Think different, Treat expectations, Treat negative emotions

A letter for new moms – How to survive through the first year of being a mother

Dear Mom,

Are you in the postpartum depression? Or if you went through it, does it make you quiver whenever you remember that hard period of time in your life?

I am writing this to you because I once had a hard labor, I once was in postpartum depression, and I once was touched out.

If you are a single mom, you probably are aware that single moms have such a large number of more issues to manage consistently than mothers who have a “significant other” to help them out. You need to work twice as hard as other moms. All things considered, generally, you are mother and father, all in one package.

The superpower you

You get the chance to be a cook, driver, housekeeper, nurse, planner, organizer, storyteller and teacher all while holding down your full-time job, just in case that you need to know the definition of exhaustion, look up “mother” in the dictionary.

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